MATHS ONLINE TEST CHAP. 14

MATHS ONLINE TEST CHAP. 14

MATHS ONLINE TEST CHAPTER 14 STATISTICS ( AANKADASHASTR) FOR GUJARATI MEDIUM STUDENTS OF GUJARAT BOARD. 

MATHS ONLINE TEST  CHAP. 14  👇👇👇



MATHS ONLINE TEST CHAP. 14

Introduction
In Class IX, you have studied the classification of given data into ungrouped as well as grouped frequency distributions. You have also learnt to represent the data pictorially in the form of various graphs such as bar graphs, histograms (including those of varying widths) and frequency polygons. 
In fact, you went a step further by studying certain numerical representatives of the ungrouped data, also called measures of central tendency, namely, mean, median and mode. In this chapter, we shall extend the study of these three measures, i.e., mean, median and mode from ungrouped data to that of grouped data. 
We shall also discuss the concept of cumulative frequency, the cumulative frequency distribution and how to draw cumulative frequency curves, called ogives.

Mean of Grouped Data
The mean (or average) of observations, as we know, is the sum of the values of all the
observations divided by the total number of observations.
Mode of Grouped Data
Recall from Class IX, a mode is that value among the observations which occurs most often, that is, the value of the observation having the maximum frequency. Further, we discussed finding the mode of ungrouped data. Here, we shall discuss ways of obtaining a mode of grouped data. 
It is possible that more than one value may have the same maximum frequency. In such situations, the data is said to be multimodal. Though grouped data can also be multimodal, we shall restrict ourselves to problems having a single mode only.
Median of Grouped Data
As you have studied in Class IX, the median is a measure of central tendency which gives the value of the middle-most observation in the data.

MATHS ONLINE TEST CHAP. 14

Now, that you have studied about all the three measures of central tendency, let us discuss which measure would be best suited for a particular requirement. The mean is the most frequently used measure of central tendency because it takes into account all the observations, and lies between the extremes, i.e., the largest and the smallest observations of the entire data. It also enables us to compare two or more distributions. For example, by comparing the average (mean) results of students of different schools of a particular examination, we can conclude which school has a better performance.
However, extreme values in the data affect the mean. For example, the mean of classes having frequencies more or less the same is a good representative of the data. But, if one class has frequency, say 2, and the five others have frequency 20, 25, 20, 21, 18, then the mean will certainly not reflect the way the data behaves. So, in such cases, the mean is not a good representative of the data.
In problems where individual observations are not important, and we wish to find out a ‘typical’ observation, the median is more appropriate, e.g., finding the typical productivity rate of workers, average wage in a country, etc. These are situations where extreme values may be there. So, rather than the mean, we take the median as a better measure of central tendency.
In situations which require establishing the most frequent value or most popular item, the mode is the best choice, e.g., to find the most popular T.V. programme being watched, the consumer item in greatest demand, the colour of the vehicle used by
most of the people, etc.
reference- NCERT textbook of std 10 maths.


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